Don’t go the trail alone – get involved!

Even when you board your horse, it can get lonely. Whether you board with one other person, 20 other people, or have your horse in your backyard, it is good to find a community to get involved with. As much as we love our alone time with our equines, it’s good to reach out and find other like-minded individuals to socialize with. There are a number of ways to get involved, even if you don’t own your own horse.

Do you show? Is your horse registered? There are a number of breed associations that you can become a part of. AQHA, APHA, American Warmblood Society and Sporthorse Registry, the Arabian circuit, Morgans, the list goes on and on. There’s a group for everyone and at all levels of competition. Many of the organizations welcome their members to get involved with the regional club – as a board member or a show volunteer, to help with social media or sponsors. All you have to do is call them up or shoot them an email. Go on their national websites and locate your local regional club and subsection of the national organization. You’ll find people all over the world just waiting to welcome you with open arms.

Is the open circuit more your style? Do you find yourself going to all barrel racing shows or do you do cowboy mounted shooting? Or are you just looking for an organization that welcomes everyone? They’re out there! Make a post on Facebook or ask around at your local tack shop. You’ll find a group to get involved in there.

Would you rather be in the woods or at the beach with your horse? All over the nation there are trail riding associations and clubs to join. These clubs plan meet ups and host big trail rides and camping sites so you can all enjoy the outdoors and your horses in a relaxed, fun manner. They can also teach you some neat tricks of the trail about what to pack and be prepared for!

Do you not have a horse? Your local horse rescues are always looking for volunteers. Or maybe you do own your own but have some free time? Almost all rescues have open barn hours or days where they accept volunteers. There’s always hay to be brought in, a barn to be painted, a horse groomed or a fence to mend. These horses and organizations appreciate any time – however short or long – you can provide!

Do you enjoy the show or expo atmosphere, but don’t know how to get involved? Many shows or expos accept volunteers. It’s a great way to meet people and lend a hand! Equine Affaire is coming up in Massachusetts in November and they’re always looking for volunteers! And for a bonus, you get into the expo for free!

No matter what way you get involved, it’s so good for your horse and for your soul to get out and about. Meet other equestrians that love horses just as much as you do. You won’t regret it!

 

In a sport of judging, help someone else smile

As a sport, we are surrounded by judging. We are judged for how we look. We are judged for how our horses look. We are judged for how we ride. But in the midst of all of that judging, we should be doing more supporting.

Statistics around rates of depression, anxiety and suicide are terrifying. It’s almost impossible to find someone that hasn’t been affected in some way by an issue with mental health. You can’t see depression from how someone is dressed. You don’t know that they’ve considered suicide from how successful or unsuccessful their ride was. You have no idea if they’re going through an anxiety attack by the brand of their show jacket.

No, you can’t “solve” them. One interaction may not lift all of their thoughts of suicide out of their mind. One saying won’t cure them of depression. But a kind word can soothe.

We as equestrians don’t do enough cheering. We are so focused on how we did that we don’t always look to the other girl in the lineup and say you did a good job. We don’t often help one another in the warm up arena as everyone is trying to navigate a ring of chaos. We don’t always try and lift each other up so everyone can do well and feel accomplished.

Yes, our sport may be about judging, but we compete to also have fun. It isn’t particularly fun to come in last every class or feel utterly defeated by a ride. What is fun, though, is being told by another competitor that they liked your shirt or that your pivot turn in a showmanship class rocked. Maybe you had a fantastic rein back in the line up. Or maybe your horse was extra shiny that day. Little comments count.

So I challenge you, fellow equestrians, just as I challenge myself. Make someone smile. Help another with their 20m dressage circle or just tell them you love their horse. Instead of just saying “maybe next time,” tell them something positive. Lift them up. Although you can’t solve everyone’s mental health issues, maybe just that kind comment keeps it at bay for a moment. It might give someone just that little bit of relief and positivity that they need to hear. You can make a difference.